Public Schools

Public Schools
“The problem with public school is not overcrowding in the classroom. The problem is not teacher unions. The problem is not underfunding or lack of computer equipment. The problem is your damn kids.” – P.J. O’Rourke

What is the issue of Public Education?
U.S. education issues in 2010 boil down to two questions: how to fund cash-strapped state universities and how to fix so-called high school “drop-out factories.”

Tuition at state-funded colleges and universities has skyrocketed as recession-starved states ask students to bear more of the cost of their education.

In one of the harshest examples, funding for the California State University system was reduced by nearly $1 billion for the academic years between 2008 and 2010.

Schools have responded by increasing fees, canceling classes, cutting student support programs and furloughing professors. California fees have increased 182 percent since 2002. Class waiting lists in the state have doubled or tripled.

In-Game Effects
When Public Schools becomes the active issue, the following happens:

Active Bonus: While Public Schools is Active, pro-public and pro-private candidates receive an additional x2 infrastructure in the states they receive positive bonuses in, listed below.

Active Penalty: While Public Schools is Active, pro-public and pro-private candidates lose an additional x2 infrastructure in the states they receive negative bonuses in, listed below.

Active Non-Stance Penalty: For those who do not have a stance on public schools, one way or another, roll 1d100 and compare to your Charisma: Spin Doctoring. if unsuccessful, be forced to take a stance immediately.

  • Pro-Public Schools:
    New York: +35
    New Jersey: +12
    Washington D.C.: +4
    Alaska: +3
    Vermont: +1
    Mississippi: -2
    Idaho: -4
    Utah: -8
    Oklahoma: -9
    Arizona: -12

Endorsement Opportunity: National Education Association. The NEA will only endorse once during the primary election and once during the general election. Per the Endorsement Action, earn $22 and one surrogate (if able).

  • Anti-Public School (Pro-Private School):
    New York: -35
    New Jersey: -12
    Washington D.C.: -4
    Alaska: -3
    Vermont: -1
    Mississippi: +2
    Idaho: +4
    Utah: +8
    Oklahoma: +9
    Arizona: +12

Endorsement Opportunity: Fordham Institute. The Fordham Institute will only endorse once during the primary election and once during the general election. Per the Endorsement Action, earn 2 surrogates.

Public Schools

The Campaign Manager thjudd